Abstract library

51 results for "Lind".
#626 Preliminary Results of a Nationwide Survey of Pancreatic Neuroendocrine Tumors in von Hippel–Lindau Disease in Japan
Introduction: von Hippel–Lindau disease (VHL) is an intractable disease characterized by various tumors including pancreatic neuroendocrine tumors (PNET).
Conference: 10th Annual ENETS Conference (2013)
Category: Epidemiology/Natural history/Prognosis - Registries, nationwide and regional surveys
Presenting Author: Dr. Hisato Igarashi
#18 Long-acting release octreotide induce complete response in type 1 gastric carcinoid tumors
Introduction: Gastric endocrine tumors (GET) are increasingly recognized due to expanding indications of upper gastrointestinal endoscopy. Often silent and benign, GET may also be aggressive when sporadic and may sometimes mimic the course of gastric adenocarcinoma. Current incidence of GETs is estimated at around 8% of digestive endocrine tumors. Yearly age-adjusted incidence is around 0.2 per population of 100,000. Gastric carcinoids (ECLomas) develop from gastric enterochromaffin-like cells (ECL cells) in response to chronically elevated gastrin. Type 1 tumors (ECLomas in the course of atrophic gastritis) may occur in conditions of achlorhydria secondary to auto-immune atrophic fundic gastritis. It occurs mostly in women and they are non-functioning tumors, typically found during upper GI endoscopy performed for dyspepsia. ECLomas present frequently as multiple polyps, usually < 1 cm in diameter in the gastric fundus. Type 1 tumors are almost exclusively benign lesions with little risk of deep invasion of the gastric parietal wall. The neoplastic ECL cells become progressively dedifferentiated with an increasing number of Ki-67 immunoreactive (IR) cell nuclei. In addition, there is a substantial decrease in argynophil and IR NE cells that can be visualized by conventional methods. ECLomas secondary to hypergastrinemia should be closely followed for signs of clinical and histopathological tumor progression. Such ECLomas deserve early, active, radical surgical treatment.
Traditionally, gastric carcinoid type 1 (GCA1s) are endoscopically or surgically removed, depending on the number, appearance and size of the tumors. Antrectomy, with surgical excision of the majority of the G cells, is thought to facilitate regression of these tumors by removing the source of excessive gastrin secretion; however, the long-term benefits of antrectomy still remain uncertain. Although proton pump inhibitors are effective in reducing hypergastrinemia-induced gastric acid hypersecretion in GCA2, they do not affect ECL-cell hyperplasia, and therefore their role in GCA1 is limited. Moreover, in selected cases, significant reduction of hypergastrinemia does not prevent development of ECL carcinoid, suggesting that, in addition to hypergastrinemia, other pathogenic or genetic factors may be involved. Treatment with somatostatin analogues (SSA) might impede ECL-cell hyperplasia by suppressing gastrin secretion and/or by a direct anti-proliferative effect on ECL cells. Treatment with SSAs in GCA1 leads to a substantial tumor load reduction, with a concomitant decrease of serum gastrin levels. Published data indicate an important anti-proliferative effect of SSA on ECL cells, providing clinical benefit and obviating, at least temporarily, the need for invasive therapies for GCA1. Morphometric studies demonstrated that, while antrectomy specifically decreased the volume of ECL cells versus the total volume of endocrine cells, octreotide reduces the overall endocrine cell volume. Although the number of treated patients is small, it has been suggested that SSA may exert important anti-proliferative effects either directly, by inhibiting ECL-cells proliferation, or indirectly through suppression of gastrin hypersecretion.
Conference: 7th Annual ENETS Conference (2010)
Category: Clinical
Presenting Author: MD Ricardo Caponero
#160 The role of T-type calcium channels in medullary thyroid carcinoma (MTC): T-type calcium channel blockers inhibit hormone secretion and induce apoptotic cell death in a human MTC cell line
Introduction: Medullary thyroid carcinoma (MTC) accounts for approximately 5-10% of thyroid cancers. In the case of tumors limited to the thyroid gland, the prognosis is generally favorable, whereas 5-year survival averages only 40% in patients with metastatic disease. In these patients, conventional chemotherapy only occasionally leads to a complete response and partial responses are observed in less than 30% of the cases. Therefore, intense efforts are currently directed toward the identification of new druggable targets for the treatment of this devastating disease.
Conference: 7th Annual ENETS Conference (2010)
Category: Basic
Presenting Author: Dr Rosario Pivonello
#1924 Multimodal Treatment of a Metastatic Pancreatic NeuroEndocrine Tumor in Von Hippel Lindau Disease
Introduction: Von Hippel-Lindau disease (VHL) is an inherited neoplastic syndrome: pancreatic lesions in 35-77% of cases, usually serous cystic adenoma (SCA), but 5-17% are non-functioning (NF) NeuroEndocrine tumors (NETs).
Conference: 14th Annual ENETS conference (2017)
Category: Medical treatment - Targeted therapies
Presenting Author: Dr Anna Caterina Milanetto
#38 Expression of mTOR signaling pathway and effects of mTOR inhibitors on its pathway in human neuroendocrine tumors
Introduction: Neuroendocrine tumors (NET), especially well-differentiated endocrine tumors, are often slow-growing, indolent, and may not become clinically apparent until the manifestations of metastatic spread or carcinoid syndrome. Results of previous studies demonstrated that phosphoinositide 3-kinase (PI3K)/Akt/mTOR signaling pathway may be activated in the great majority of NET cells. mTOR inhibitors are therefore considered effective anti-tumor reagents but they may also induce an activation of PI3K/Akt and MAPK pathways as a compensatory action and reduce their own anti-tumor activities.
Conference: 7th Annual ENETS Conference (2010)
Category: Basic
Presenting Author: Professor Hironobu Sasano
Authors: Iida S, Miki Y, Ono K, Sasano H, ...
#775 Whole Exome Sequence Of BON-1 And QGP-1, Two Human Pancreatic Neuroendocrine Tumor Cell Lines, Reveals Homozygous Loss Of Function Mutations In TP53, HRNR and CYFIP2.
Introduction: The human BON-1 and QGP-1 cell lines are two models often used in pancreatic neuroendocrine tumor (PNET) research. Data on protein-changing mutations in these cell lines is lacking.
Conference: 10th Annual ENETS Conference (2013)
Category: Non digestive NETs (bronchial, MTC, pheochromocytoma)
Presenting Author: Timon Vandamme
#1246 68 Yr Female with a Growing Inoperable Myocardial Metastase
Introduction: Two recent studies shows that cardiac metastases occur rather frequently, 13% in a population of serotoninproducing NETs(Noordzij 2014) and 4% in our own patient kohort of ileal NETs(Calissendorff 2014).
Conference: 12th Annual ENETS Conference (2015)
Category: Clinical cases/reports
Presenting Author: MD PhD Kristina Linder Ekberg
Authors: Linder Ekberg K, ...
#1461 Whole Exome Sequencing of Three Families with Small Intestine Neuroendocrine Tumors
Introduction: Small intestine neuroendocrine tumors (siNETs) are the most prevalent small intestine neoplasms. However, familial siNETs are rarely described.
Conference: 13th Annual ENETS conference (2016)
Category: Basic Science - Genetics, epigenetics, miRNAs
Presenting Author: Matthias Beyens
#1925 SSA-, H1, H2- and Leukotriene Receptor Blockade Eliminates Handicapping Symptoms from Atypical Carcinoid Syndrome
Introduction: The patient is a female, 59 yrs , previously healthy except from mild allergic rinitis since 12 years of age and at 49 a suspected anaphylaxis after hazelnut intake.
Conference: 14th Annual ENETS conference (2017)
Category: Clinical cases/reports
Presenting Author: MD PhD Kristina Linder Ekberg
Keywords: PGD2
#22 A Case Illustrative of Phenotypic Heterogeneity and Challenges in the Management of Paraganglioma
Introduction: Paragangliomas (PGLs) are extra-adrenal, usually benign, highly vascularized tumors that originate from neural-crest-derived chromaffin cells. These tumors are subdivided as either sympathetic or parasympathetic, depending on their location and catecholamine production. Sympathetic PGLs are situated along the abdominal sympathetic trunk and usually produce catecholamines, whereas parasympathetic PGLs are located in the head and neck, and these usually do not produce catecholamines. PGLs may present as sporadic or inherited tumor syndrome, including MEN 2, with RET germline mutations, von Hippel-Lindau (VHL) disease due to germline mutations in VHL gene, and pheochromocytoma-PGL syndrome. The latter is frequently a hereditary condition and is caused by germline mutations in the SDHB, SDHC, or SDHC genes. Patients with familial PGLs may present at a younger age, often as multifocal tumors, with an increased risk of recurrence and a higher frequency of malignancy in those with SDHB mutations. SDH mutations induce angiogenesis and tumorogenesis through the inhibition of hypoxia-inducible factors (HIF)-propyl hyroxylase. A younger age at onset, malignancy, and a positive family history are clinical parameters of high specificity, but low sensitivity for diagnosis. Genetic analysis for mutations in SDH genes for the patient and family members, and surveillance for the affected patient and family members, are necessary where there are no clear clinical or family indicators for the syndrome. We present a case of a large abdominal malignant PGL in a 20-year-old pt. that went on without clinical detection for at least three years.
Conference: 7th Annual ENETS Conference (2010)
Category: Clinical
Presenting Author: Dr Mohammed Ahmed
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