Abstract library

1916 results for "Well- and moderately differentiated neuroendocrine tumors".
#78 The diagnostic and prognostic value of elevated proGRP levels in well- and moderately differentiated neuroendocrine tumors
Introduction: Chromogranin A (CgA) is the most frequently used marker in well- (grade 1) and moderately (grade 2) differentiated NETs. Although CgA is a more sensitive marker than the 5-HIAA, which was widely used until the last decade, CgA has some limitations. False-positively elevated CgA may occur in renal impairment, atrophic gastritis and during treatment of proton-pump inhibitors. Progastrin-releasing peptide (proGRP) was recently reported as a promising tumor marker for small cell lung cancer. Limited data suggests that ProGRP may be a potential tumor marker in NE tumors.
Conference: 7th Annual ENETS Conference (2010)
Category: Basic
Presenting Author: Msc Catharina M Korse
#106 Gastroenteropancreatic neuroendocrine tumors: single institution clinicopathological study
Introduction: Neuroendocrine cells are widely distributed throughout the body, and neoplasms from these dispersed cells can arise at many sites. They are distinguished into two broad categories: 1) Tumors identified as small cell lung carcinomas with biology and natural history of a high-grade malignancy and characteristics of small cell undifferentiated or anaplastic appearance by light microscopy. The WHO categorizes these tumors as poorly-differentiated neuroendocrine carcinomas; 2) Well-defined neuroendocrine tumors (NETs) with variable, but most lyindolent biologic behavior and characteristic well-differentiated histologic features. The majority arise in the gastrointestinal tract and collectively they are referred as gastroenteropancreatic neuroendocrine tumors (GEP/NETs). They include carcinoid tumors, pancreatic islet cell tumors (gastrinoma, insulinoma, glucagonoma, VIPoma, somatostatinoma), paragangliomas, pheochromocytomas, and medullary thyroid carcinomas. The WHO classifies the GEP/NETs as well-differentiated NETs (carcinoid tumors) if they are noninvasive and have benign behavior or uncertain malignant potential. In contrast, GEP/NETs with characteristics of low-grade malignancy with invasion of the muscularis propria or beyond, or metastases, are characterized as well-differentiated neuroendocrine carcinomas (malignant carcinoids). Pancreatic islet cell tumors, whether functioning or not, are classified as well-differentiated NETs or well-differentiated neuroendocrine carcinomas, due to the (depending on) histologic characteristics. The WHO classification for gastroenteropancreatic NETs based on stage (ie size and presence of metastases) and grade (mitotic rate, perineural and lymphovascular invasion, Ki-67 proliferative index) categorizes them as well-differentiated NETs, e.g., carcinoid tumors, or as well-differentiated neuroendocrine carcinomas.
Conference: 7th Annual ENETS Conference (2010)
Category: Clinical
Presenting Author: Dr Michael M. Vaslamatzis
#144 Oxaliplatin-based chemotherapy in patients with advanced neuroendocrine carcinoma: an Italian retrospective multicenter analysis
Introduction: Conventional chemotherapy does not have a well-defined role in well/moderately differentiated (WD) neuroendocrine carcinomas (NECs). Various regimens were evaluated. Cisplatin or carboplatin combined with etoposide are usually indicated in poorly differentiated (PD) NECs. Some evidence exists for oxaliplatin activity in WD and PD NECs, combined with capecitabine or gemcitabine.
Conference: 7th Annual ENETS Conference (2010)
Category: Clinical
Presenting Author: Francesca Spada
#161 Low Dose Multiple Cycle (LD/MT) Peptide Receptor Radionuclide Therapy: a new concept for the treatment of well-differentiated metastatic neuroendocrine tumors
Introduction: It has been shown experimentally that low dose radiation can effectively kill slow growing cancer cells. Also, external beam radiation therapy applies a fractionated delivery of radiation dose to reduce toxicity with equal or even better therapeutic efficacy.
Conference: 7th Annual ENETS Conference (2010)
Category: Clinical
Presenting Author: Dr. Vikas Prasad
#216 Patients Treated for Well-Differentiated Neuroendocrine Tumors: A Study to Evaluate the Ratio of Patients Lost to Follow-up
Introduction: Well-differentiated neuroendocrine tumors (wdNET) are considered more indolent than other epithelial malignancies. Median survival for patients with G1/G2 NET can range from 33 to 223 months.
Conference: 8th Annual ENETS Conference (2011)
Category: Clinical
Presenting Author: Pr Rosine Guimbaud
#301 Medical and Peptide Receptor Radionuclide Therapy (PRRT) with Somatostatin Analogues (SSA) in Well- and Moderately Differentiated Neuroendocrine Tumors
Introduction: PRRT is a treatment choice for inoperable or metastasized neuroendocrine tumors and this therapy seems more effective in the biochemical and volume control of disease than SSA alone.
Conference: 8th Annual ENETS Conference (2011)
Category: Clinical
Presenting Author: Prof Laura De Marinis
#311 Treatment and Prognosis of Patients with Poorly Differentiated Neuroendocrine Tumors
Introduction: Poorly differentiated neuroendocrine tumors (PDEC) represent less than 10% of all neuroendocrine tumors but have a poor prognosis.
Conference: 8th Annual ENETS Conference (2011)
Category: Clinical
Presenting Author: Dr. Henning Grønbæk
#382 Invaded, Moderately Differentiated Neuroendocrine Carcinoma of Larynx
Introduction: Neuroendocrine neoplasm is extremely unusual and rare in the larynx. It accounts for less than 1% of all laryngeal malignancies. According to the origin, this tumor can be divided into neural and epithelial groups and epithelial origin tumors are further sub-classified based on the degree of differentiation (well-, moderately and poorly differentiated).
Conference: 9th Annual ENETS Conference (2012)
Category: Basic
Presenting Author: Shahin Nateghi
#867 Mixed Adenoneuroendocrine Carcinoma (MANECs): A Rare and Challenging Subgroup of Neuroendocrine Neoplasia
Introduction: Mixed Adenoneuroendocrine Carcinomas (MANECs) are rare entities in which at least 30% of neoplastic cells are neuroendocrine in nature (WHO 2010 classification). They result either from two independent lesions that merge together or are unique lesions with different cell populations intermingled.
Conference: 11th Annual ENETS Conference (2014)
Category: Pathology, grading, staging
Presenting Author: Dr Conor Mosli Lynch
#1751 A Case with Multiple Neuroendocrine Tumors
Introduction: Multiple endocrine neoplasia (MEN) is characterized by the occurrence of tumours involving two or more endocrine glands. MEN 1 is characterized by parathyroid adenoma, pancreaticoduodenal neuroendocrine tumors (PNTs), and pituitary adenomas.
Conference: 14th Annual ENETS conference (2017)
Category: Clinical cases/reports
Presenting Author: MD Alexandre Dermine