Abstract library

237 results for "head and neck".
#628 Sequential Chemo-Radiation Therapy for Locally Advanced Neuroendocrine Carcinoma of Head and Neck
Introduction: Neuroendocrine carcinomas (NECs) of the head and neck are considered an infrequent clinico-pathological entity. Combined modality treatment represents an established therapeutic option for poorly differentiated forms where distant metastasis is a common pattern of failure.
Conference: 10th Annual ENETS Conference (2013)
Category: Epidemiology/Natural history/Prognosis - Descriptive epidemiology
Presenting Author: Young Mi Seol
Authors: Seol Y M
#474 Difficulties in Diagnosis and Management of Neuroendocrine Tumors of the Head and Neck: A Case Report
Introduction: Primary neuroendocrine carcinomas (NEC) are uncommon head and neck malignancies. They present with a varied histopathologic spectrum in sinonasal and other subsites.
Conference: 9th Annual ENETS Conference (2012)
Category: Clinical
Presenting Author: Alla Markovich
#946 Immunohistochemical Staining of Catecholamine-Synthesizing Enzymes in Head and Neck Paraganglioma Tissue
Introduction: Head and neck paragangliomas (HNPGLs) are non-producing neuroendocrine tumors, alhough 19-28% of patients have an increased dopamine production. The high sensitivity of 18F-DOPA PET also shows that these tumors might be able to synthesize catecholamines.
Conference: 11th Annual ENETS Conference (2014)
Category: Non digestive NETs (bronchial, MTC, pheochromocytoma)
Presenting Author: Dr Anouk Van der Horst-Schrivers
#111 Atypical lung carcinoid tumor metastatic to endocrine glands and bone marrow
Introduction: Bronchopulmonary neuroendocrine tumors (BP-NETs) comprise 20% of all lung cancers. Typical low grade carcinoid tumors (TC) represent the majority of BP-carcinoids. Intermediate grade atypical carcinoid tumors (AC) are less often encountered but more aggressive. Although metastatic dissemination to mediastinal lymph nodes, liver, skeleton and central nervous system (CNS) is common, involvement of the endocrine glands has rarely been reported.
Conference: 7th Annual ENETS Conference (2010)
Category: Clinical
Presenting Author: Dr Vasiliki Daraki
#22 A Case Illustrative of Phenotypic Heterogeneity and Challenges in the Management of Paraganglioma
Introduction: Paragangliomas (PGLs) are extra-adrenal, usually benign, highly vascularized tumors that originate from neural-crest-derived chromaffin cells. These tumors are subdivided as either sympathetic or parasympathetic, depending on their location and catecholamine production. Sympathetic PGLs are situated along the abdominal sympathetic trunk and usually produce catecholamines, whereas parasympathetic PGLs are located in the head and neck, and these usually do not produce catecholamines. PGLs may present as sporadic or inherited tumor syndrome, including MEN 2, with RET germline mutations, von Hippel-Lindau (VHL) disease due to germline mutations in VHL gene, and pheochromocytoma-PGL syndrome. The latter is frequently a hereditary condition and is caused by germline mutations in the SDHB, SDHC, or SDHC genes. Patients with familial PGLs may present at a younger age, often as multifocal tumors, with an increased risk of recurrence and a higher frequency of malignancy in those with SDHB mutations. SDH mutations induce angiogenesis and tumorogenesis through the inhibition of hypoxia-inducible factors (HIF)-propyl hyroxylase. A younger age at onset, malignancy, and a positive family history are clinical parameters of high specificity, but low sensitivity for diagnosis. Genetic analysis for mutations in SDH genes for the patient and family members, and surveillance for the affected patient and family members, are necessary where there are no clear clinical or family indicators for the syndrome. We present a case of a large abdominal malignant PGL in a 20-year-old pt. that went on without clinical detection for at least three years.
Conference: 7th Annual ENETS Conference (2010)
Category: Clinical
Presenting Author: Dr Mohammed Ahmed
#273 The Succinate Dehydrogenase Genetic Testing in Patients with Extra-adrenal Paragangliomas: The Portuguese Cancer Center (Lisboa) Experience
Introduction: Extra-adrenal paragangliomas (PGLs) occur as sporadic or familial entities, the latter mostly in association with germline mutations of the SDHB, SDHC or SDHD genes.
Conference: 8th Annual ENETS Conference (2011)
Category: Basic
Presenting Author: Rita Domingues
#372 A Retrospective Analysis of Neuroendocrine Tumors (NETs) in West Azarbaijan of Iran
Introduction: NETs are most often located in the intestine and lungs but they can occur in other areas of the body. Limited data are available on epidemiology and clinical patterns of NETs in Iran.
Conference: 9th Annual ENETS Conference (2012)
Category: Clinical
Presenting Author: Dr Nasim Valizadeh
#1131 M-TORC1 Complex Is Significantly Over-Activated in SDHx-Mutated Paragangliomas
Introduction: The activation patterns of mTOR pathway in sporadic and hereditary pheochromocytomas (PCC) and paragangliomas (PGL) are poorly recognized.
Conference: 12th Annual ENETS Conference (2015)
Category: Basic Science - mTOR and other pathways, signalling, receptors
Presenting Author: MD, PhD Marco Volante
Keywords: PCC, PGL, mTOR, SDHx
#1769 Minimal Risk of Persistent or Recurrent Hypoglycemia after MEN1-Related Insulinoma Surgery. A Large International Cohort Study
Introduction: Current literature states that 15-30% of the MEN1 patients suffer from hypoglycemia after insulinoma surgery.
Conference: 14th Annual ENETS conference (2017)
Category: Surgical treatment
Presenting Author: Drs. Sjoerd Nell
Keywords: MEN1
#84 Rare association between pancreatic insulinoma and Graves's disease: fortune or misfortune?
Introduction: In spite of low frequency ( 4 cases in 1 million population), insulimoma is a significant pathology because hypoglycemia causes severe neurologic lesions and death.
Conference: 7th Annual ENETS Conference (2010)
Category: Clinical
Presenting Author: Dr Carmen Barbu
Authors: Barbu C, Stefan C, Miron A, Giulea C, ...
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