Abstract library

106 results for "pathology".
#813 Comparison of Manual and Automatic Methods of Ki-67 Proliferation Index for Neuroendocrine Tumors: The Development and Validation of a Novel Digital Pathology Tool (Ki-67Counter)
Introduction: Ki-67 proliferation index is an increasingly important biomarker used to grade neuroendocrine tumors. Manual counting methods are laborious and subject to inter- and intra-observer variability. Digital counting methods hold promise for fast and reproducible indices, however, they are fraught with technical difficulties.
Conference: 11th Annual ENETS Conference (2014)
Category: Pathology, grading, staging
Presenting Author: Dr. Lin Yang
Authors: Neltner J, Su H, Xing F, Rosser J, ...
#1184 A National Pathology Registration Analysis of Applied Terminology in Pulmonary Neuroendocrine Tumors/Carcinomas: Is the WHO 2004 Classification in Line with Clinical Practice?
Introduction: Nomenclature of the WHO 2004 should be used for pulmonary neuro-endocrine tumors (NET) and carcinomas (NEC) classification.
Conference: 12th Annual ENETS Conference (2015)
Category: Non digestive NETs (bronchial, MTC, pheochromocytoma)
Presenting Author: MD Jules Derks
Keywords: NET, Diagnosis
#343 PCR Assessment of Carcinoid Lymph Node Metastasis CgA Transcript Outperforms Immunostaining, Tyramide Signal Amplification and H&E and Significantly Upstages Disease
Introduction: Accurate neuroendocrine tumor (NETs) staging is vital for determining therapeutic strategy. Sensitive techniques to facilitate identification of metastases (mets) are of critical clinical relevance.
Conference: 8th Annual ENETS Conference (2011)
Category: Clinical
Presenting Author: Dr Mark Kidd
Authors: Lawrence B, Kenney B, Kidd M, Modlin I, ...
#948 Clinicopathological Characteristics of Colorectal Neuroendocrine Tumor in Chinese Patients
Introduction: Colorectal neuroendocrine tumors (cNET) are increasing, but rarely do studies report the clinicopathology in Chinese patients.
Conference: 11th Annual ENETS Conference (2014)
Category: Epidemiology/Natural history/Prognosis - Descriptive epidemiology
Presenting Author: Dr. Wei-Xian Hu
Authors: Hu W X, Zhang Y F, Wang J J, Li Y, ...
#106 Gastroenteropancreatic neuroendocrine tumors: single institution clinicopathological study
Introduction: Neuroendocrine cells are widely distributed throughout the body, and neoplasms from these dispersed cells can arise at many sites. They are distinguished into two broad categories: 1) Tumors identified as small cell lung carcinomas with biology and natural history of a high-grade malignancy and characteristics of small cell undifferentiated or anaplastic appearance by light microscopy. The WHO categorizes these tumors as poorly-differentiated neuroendocrine carcinomas; 2) Well-defined neuroendocrine tumors (NETs) with variable, but most lyindolent biologic behavior and characteristic well-differentiated histologic features. The majority arise in the gastrointestinal tract and collectively they are referred as gastroenteropancreatic neuroendocrine tumors (GEP/NETs). They include carcinoid tumors, pancreatic islet cell tumors (gastrinoma, insulinoma, glucagonoma, VIPoma, somatostatinoma), paragangliomas, pheochromocytomas, and medullary thyroid carcinomas. The WHO classifies the GEP/NETs as well-differentiated NETs (carcinoid tumors) if they are noninvasive and have benign behavior or uncertain malignant potential. In contrast, GEP/NETs with characteristics of low-grade malignancy with invasion of the muscularis propria or beyond, or metastases, are characterized as well-differentiated neuroendocrine carcinomas (malignant carcinoids). Pancreatic islet cell tumors, whether functioning or not, are classified as well-differentiated NETs or well-differentiated neuroendocrine carcinomas, due to the (depending on) histologic characteristics. The WHO classification for gastroenteropancreatic NETs based on stage (ie size and presence of metastases) and grade (mitotic rate, perineural and lymphovascular invasion, Ki-67 proliferative index) categorizes them as well-differentiated NETs, e.g., carcinoid tumors, or as well-differentiated neuroendocrine carcinomas.
Conference: 7th Annual ENETS Conference (2010)
Category: Clinical
Presenting Author: Dr Michael M. Vaslamatzis
#206 Diverging Incidence and Survival Trends for Neuroendocrine Tumors due to Histological Grade
Introduction: Epidemiological data of NET are mostly classified according to the primary site of the tumor. However, a pathologic classification, irrespective of primary site, might be more informative.
Conference: 8th Annual ENETS Conference (2011)
Category: Clinical
Presenting Author: MSc Catharina M Korse
#609 Clinicopathological Analysis in 119 Cases of Rectal Neuroendocrine Tumors
Introduction: The new diagnostic criteria of the WHO 2010 Neuroendocrine Tumour Classification are not understood and applied in China.
Conference: 10th Annual ENETS Conference (2013)
Category: Pathology, grading, staging
Presenting Author: Professor Po Zhao
Authors: Meng M, Zhao P, ...
#611 GEP-NET in 2012 from Chinese People’s Libration Army General Hospital
Introduction: WHO 2010 GEP-NET Classification without the traditional terms as carcinoid and atypical carcinoid is not well-accepted in China.
Conference: 10th Annual ENETS Conference (2013)
Category: Pathology, grading, staging
Presenting Author: Professor Po Zhao
Authors: Zhao P, Meng M, ...
#653 Interobserver Variability of Pulmonary Carcinoids
Introduction: Lung carcinoids are neuroendocrine tumors histopathologically classified into typical (TC; no necrosis, <2 mitoses/2 mm2) and atypical (AC; necrosis or 2-10 mitoses/2 mm2). Identification of mitoses may be hampered by the presence of apoptotic cells, and reported prediction of prognosis based on histopathology varies, especially for ACs.
Conference: 10th Annual ENETS Conference (2013)
Category: PRRT-Ablative therapies-Endoscopic treatment
Presenting Author: MSc Dorian Swarts
#693 Histopathological Reporting of Neuroendocrine Tumors: A 4-Year Tertiary Referral Centre Experience
Introduction: Histopathological recognition of neuroendocrine tumors (NETs) is straightforward, however, sub-classification, grading and staging is challenging with frequently evolving pathological criteria.
Conference: 10th Annual ENETS Conference (2013)
Category: Pathology, grading, staging
Presenting Author: Dr Anna Karpathakis