Abstract library

122 results for "reduction".
#2232 Role of Interval Reduction of Somatostatin Analogs in Patients with Progressive Neuroendocrine Tumors: Our Experience
Introduction: Interval reduction of somatostatin analogs (SSAs) is a possibly strategy for elderly patients with progressive metastatic neuroendocrine tumors (NETs). Patients with diagnosis of NET are >75 years old in the 25% of cases. No randomized studies are available to evaluate efficacy of this treatment schedule.
Conference: 15th Annual ENETS conference (2018)
Category: Medical treatment - Chemotherapy Somatostatin analogues, Interferon
Presenting Author: Ivana Puliafito
#1352 Outcomes of Cytoreductive Surgery for Well-Differentiated Metastatic Neuroendocrine Tumors in the Setting of Extra-Hepatic Metastases
Introduction: Cytoreduction with extra-hepatic disease for neuroendocrine tumors (NET) remains controversial
Conference: 13th Annual ENETS conference (2016)
Category: Surgical treatment
Presenting Author: Hallet Julie
#1036 Abrogation of Autophagy by Chloroquine in Neuroendocrine Tumor Cells Treated with mTOR Inhibitors Induces Apoptosis, While Reduction of Cell Proliferation is Due to a Chloroquine, Autophagy Unrelated, Lysosomal Effect
Introduction: The therapy options for patients with advanced NETs are limited. The mTOR inhibitors (mTORi), Torin1 and NVP-BEZ235, are known to suppress cell proliferation in NETs. However, cancer cells may use mTORi-induced autophagy to prolong survival, evading the anti-cancer effect. Chloroquine (CQ) and hydroxychloroquine (HCQ) have been shown to inhibit autophagy.
Conference: 12th Annual ENETS Conference (2015)
Category: Basic Science - mTOR and other pathways, signalling, receptors
Presenting Author: PhD Shani Avniel-Polak
Keywords: NETs, autophagy, mTORi
#870 Telotristat Etiprate (TE) in a Cohort of Carcinoid Heart Disease Patients in Two Phase 2 Trials
Introduction: Serotonin is a key mediator of carcinoid syndrome (CS). High levels of urinary 5-hydroxyindoleacetic acid (u5-HIAA, a serotonin metabolite) have also been linked with carcinoid heart disease (CaHD). Telotristat etiprate (TE), a novel, oral inhibitor of serotonin synthesis, is in Phase 3 development for the treatment of CS.
Conference: 11th Annual ENETS Conference (2014)
Category: Medical treatment - Others
Presenting Author: Darren Wheeler
#1068 Telotristat Etiprate in a Subset of Carcinoid Syndrome Patients Who Have High Levels of Urinary 5-hydroxyindoleacetic Acid and Frequent Flushing
Introduction: Serotonin is a key mediator of carcinoid syndrome (CS). CS patients (pts) with high levels of urinary 5-hydroxyindoleacetic acid (u5-HIAA, a serotonin metabolite) and >3 flushing episodes/day are at increased risk of developing carcinoid heart disease (CaHD).
Conference: 12th Annual ENETS Conference (2015)
Category: Medical treatment - Others
Presenting Author: Darren Wheeler
#1354 Patient Interviews in TELESTAR, a Phase 3 Study of Telotristat Etiprate, Report Meaningful Improvement in Carcinoid Syndrome
Introduction: Telotristat etiprate (TE) reduces serotonin production. In TELESTAR, a phase 3 study in patients (pts) with carcinoid syndrome (CS) on somatostatin analogues with ≥4 bowel movements (BM) per day, TE significantly reduced BM frequency (freq). Overall (n=135), durable response (DR, ≥30% reduction in BMs/day for ≥50% of the study period) was observed in 44% (250 mg tid) and 42% (500 mg tid), vs 20% on placebo (PBO); p≤0.02 for each TE vs. PBO. A subset with similar demographics to the overall trial was interviewed.
Conference: 13th Annual ENETS conference (2016)
Category: Medical treatment - Others
Presenting Author: Marianne Pavel
Authors: Pavel M, Hörsch D, Anthony L, Ervin C, ...
#18 Long-acting release octreotide induce complete response in type 1 gastric carcinoid tumors
Introduction: Gastric endocrine tumors (GET) are increasingly recognized due to expanding indications of upper gastrointestinal endoscopy. Often silent and benign, GET may also be aggressive when sporadic and may sometimes mimic the course of gastric adenocarcinoma. Current incidence of GETs is estimated at around 8% of digestive endocrine tumors. Yearly age-adjusted incidence is around 0.2 per population of 100,000. Gastric carcinoids (ECLomas) develop from gastric enterochromaffin-like cells (ECL cells) in response to chronically elevated gastrin. Type 1 tumors (ECLomas in the course of atrophic gastritis) may occur in conditions of achlorhydria secondary to auto-immune atrophic fundic gastritis. It occurs mostly in women and they are non-functioning tumors, typically found during upper GI endoscopy performed for dyspepsia. ECLomas present frequently as multiple polyps, usually < 1 cm in diameter in the gastric fundus. Type 1 tumors are almost exclusively benign lesions with little risk of deep invasion of the gastric parietal wall. The neoplastic ECL cells become progressively dedifferentiated with an increasing number of Ki-67 immunoreactive (IR) cell nuclei. In addition, there is a substantial decrease in argynophil and IR NE cells that can be visualized by conventional methods. ECLomas secondary to hypergastrinemia should be closely followed for signs of clinical and histopathological tumor progression. Such ECLomas deserve early, active, radical surgical treatment.
Traditionally, gastric carcinoid type 1 (GCA1s) are endoscopically or surgically removed, depending on the number, appearance and size of the tumors. Antrectomy, with surgical excision of the majority of the G cells, is thought to facilitate regression of these tumors by removing the source of excessive gastrin secretion; however, the long-term benefits of antrectomy still remain uncertain. Although proton pump inhibitors are effective in reducing hypergastrinemia-induced gastric acid hypersecretion in GCA2, they do not affect ECL-cell hyperplasia, and therefore their role in GCA1 is limited. Moreover, in selected cases, significant reduction of hypergastrinemia does not prevent development of ECL carcinoid, suggesting that, in addition to hypergastrinemia, other pathogenic or genetic factors may be involved. Treatment with somatostatin analogues (SSA) might impede ECL-cell hyperplasia by suppressing gastrin secretion and/or by a direct anti-proliferative effect on ECL cells. Treatment with SSAs in GCA1 leads to a substantial tumor load reduction, with a concomitant decrease of serum gastrin levels. Published data indicate an important anti-proliferative effect of SSA on ECL cells, providing clinical benefit and obviating, at least temporarily, the need for invasive therapies for GCA1. Morphometric studies demonstrated that, while antrectomy specifically decreased the volume of ECL cells versus the total volume of endocrine cells, octreotide reduces the overall endocrine cell volume. Although the number of treated patients is small, it has been suggested that SSA may exert important anti-proliferative effects either directly, by inhibiting ECL-cells proliferation, or indirectly through suppression of gastrin hypersecretion.
Conference: 7th Annual ENETS Conference (2010)
Category: Clinical
Presenting Author: MD Ricardo Caponero
#19 Antitumor activity of Pasireotide (SOM230) alone and in combination with Everolimus (RAD001) in DU-145 human prostate cancer model
Introduction: Pasireotide (SOM230) is a novel multi-receptor ligand somatostatin analogue with high affinity for somatostatin receptor subtypes sst1,2,3 and sst5. Like octreotide, which binds primarily to sst2, it inhibits hypersecretion of hormones from patients with functional pituitary tumors and gastroenteropancreatic neuroendocrine (GEP/NET) tumors. In addition, tumor shrinkage has been observed with both compounds in patients with acromegaly, Cushing’s disease and GEP/NETs, but its tumor-reducing mechanism of action has so far not been revealed. In patients with breast and liver cancer, octreotide had little or no antitumor activity.
Conference: 7th Annual ENETS Conference (2010)
Category: Basic
Presenting Author: Dr. Herbert A. Schmid
Authors: Schmid H A, Chiara L, Nuciforo P, ...
#121 Serotonin synthesis inhibitors: a novel approach for managing gastrointestinal symptoms in carcinoid syndrome
Introduction: Carcinoid syndrome (CS) occurs when metastatic carcinoid tumors secrete large amounts of serotonin (5-HT) and other bioactive substances into systemic circulation, causing a variety of symptoms, including GI symptoms such as profound diarrhea. Reduction in 5-HT production by the tumor would be expected to improve symptoms in patients with CS.
Conference: 7th Annual ENETS Conference (2010)
Category: Clinical
Presenting Author: Jay L Mitchell
#148 Near-complete regression of liver metastatic lesions in a patient with advanced pancreatic gastrinoma in response to somatostatin analogue therapy following cytoreductive surgery
Introduction: Although the majority of pancreatic NETs present with hepatic metastases, surgery with curative intent should be the first consideration. Cytoreductive surgery by resection of primary and secondary deposits may be of value in achieving local or endocrine symptoms control.
Conference: 7th Annual ENETS Conference (2010)
Category: Clinical
Presenting Author: Dr Dorota Dworakowska
Authors: Dworakowska D, Whyte M, Kane P, Patel A, ...