Abstract library

61 results for "synaptophysin".
#56 Somatostatinreceptor scintigraphy with Tc-99m-tektrotyd in patients with neuroendocrine tumors: correlation with immunohistochemistry
Introduction: Somatostatin receptor scintigraphy (STRS) with Tc-99m-tektrotyd has been used in the past few years for diagnosis and staging of neuroendocrine tumors (NETs). A number of clinicopathologic criteria proved to be useful predictors of malignant behavior of these tumors. Immunohistochemical markers for NETs include cell proliferation (Ki-67 index) and neuroendocrine markers such as chromogranin A (CgA) and synaptophysin.
Conference: 7th Annual ENETS Conference (2010)
Category: Clinical
Presenting Author: Prof Margarida Rodrigues
#384 A Pilot Study on the Immunohistochemical Expression of Chromogranin and/or Synaptophysin in Moderate to Poorly Differentiated Gastroenteropancreatic Carcinomas
Introduction: Recent advances in specific treatment for neuroendocrine tumors (NETs) prompted us to reinvestigate the old phenomenon of neuroendocrine differentiation in carcinomas of the GI tract which has previously been shown to carry no prognostic significance.
Conference: 9th Annual ENETS Conference (2012)
Category: Clinical
Presenting Author: Dr tony W Shek
Authors: Shek T W, Lam W Y, Yao H, Tang V, ...
Keywords: NET, IHC
#145 Paragangliomas: a series of five cases
Introduction: Paraganglioma is a rare extraadrenal neuroendocrine tumor, composed of chromaffin cells and arising from the neural crest. The head, neck, and retroperitoneum are the most common sites for paraganglioma.
Conference: 7th Annual ENETS Conference (2010)
Category: Clinical
Presenting Author: Assoc. Professor Catalina Poiana
Authors: Poiana C, Carsote M, Paun D, Hortopan D, ...
#46 Neuroendocrine markers are expressed in human mammary glands
Introduction: Regulatory peptides have previously been detected in epithelial cells of human mammary glands. As these peptides are produced by scattered neuroendocrine cells in the epithelium of other tissues the aim of this study was to investigate whether the mammary glands express molecular markers for neuroendocrine cells.
Conference: 7th Annual ENETS Conference (2010)
Category: Clinical
Presenting Author: Malin Grönberg
#106 Gastroenteropancreatic neuroendocrine tumors: single institution clinicopathological study
Introduction: Neuroendocrine cells are widely distributed throughout the body, and neoplasms from these dispersed cells can arise at many sites. They are distinguished into two broad categories: 1) Tumors identified as small cell lung carcinomas with biology and natural history of a high-grade malignancy and characteristics of small cell undifferentiated or anaplastic appearance by light microscopy. The WHO categorizes these tumors as poorly-differentiated neuroendocrine carcinomas; 2) Well-defined neuroendocrine tumors (NETs) with variable, but most lyindolent biologic behavior and characteristic well-differentiated histologic features. The majority arise in the gastrointestinal tract and collectively they are referred as gastroenteropancreatic neuroendocrine tumors (GEP/NETs). They include carcinoid tumors, pancreatic islet cell tumors (gastrinoma, insulinoma, glucagonoma, VIPoma, somatostatinoma), paragangliomas, pheochromocytomas, and medullary thyroid carcinomas. The WHO classifies the GEP/NETs as well-differentiated NETs (carcinoid tumors) if they are noninvasive and have benign behavior or uncertain malignant potential. In contrast, GEP/NETs with characteristics of low-grade malignancy with invasion of the muscularis propria or beyond, or metastases, are characterized as well-differentiated neuroendocrine carcinomas (malignant carcinoids). Pancreatic islet cell tumors, whether functioning or not, are classified as well-differentiated NETs or well-differentiated neuroendocrine carcinomas, due to the (depending on) histologic characteristics. The WHO classification for gastroenteropancreatic NETs based on stage (ie size and presence of metastases) and grade (mitotic rate, perineural and lymphovascular invasion, Ki-67 proliferative index) categorizes them as well-differentiated NETs, e.g., carcinoid tumors, or as well-differentiated neuroendocrine carcinomas.
Conference: 7th Annual ENETS Conference (2010)
Category: Clinical
Presenting Author: Dr Michael M. Vaslamatzis
#558 MANECs Among Colorectal Signet Ring Cell Carcinomas
Introduction: The mixed adenoneuroendocrine carcinomas (MANEC, WHO 2010) are neoplasms with heterogeneous morphology, whose mixed nature may be difficult to recognize.
Conference: 9th Annual ENETS Conference (2012)
Category: Basic
Presenting Author: MD Gratiana Hermann
#1592 Primary Neuroendocrine Carcinoma of the Breast: A Diagnostic Approach to the Special Type of Breast Malignancy
Introduction: WHO classification from 2003 defines primary neuroendocrine carcinomas (NEC) of the breast as a group of tumors with expression of neuroendocrine markers in more than 50% of tumor cells. In the current WHO classification this category is renamed to “carcinomas with neuroendocrine features” without defined clear-cut of the percentage of tumor cells positive for neuroendocrine markers.
Conference: 14th Annual ENETS conference (2017)
Category: Non digestive NETs (bronchial, MTC pheochromocytoma) Pathology, grading, staging
Presenting Author: Alma Demirović
#22 A Case Illustrative of Phenotypic Heterogeneity and Challenges in the Management of Paraganglioma
Introduction: Paragangliomas (PGLs) are extra-adrenal, usually benign, highly vascularized tumors that originate from neural-crest-derived chromaffin cells. These tumors are subdivided as either sympathetic or parasympathetic, depending on their location and catecholamine production. Sympathetic PGLs are situated along the abdominal sympathetic trunk and usually produce catecholamines, whereas parasympathetic PGLs are located in the head and neck, and these usually do not produce catecholamines. PGLs may present as sporadic or inherited tumor syndrome, including MEN 2, with RET germline mutations, von Hippel-Lindau (VHL) disease due to germline mutations in VHL gene, and pheochromocytoma-PGL syndrome. The latter is frequently a hereditary condition and is caused by germline mutations in the SDHB, SDHC, or SDHC genes. Patients with familial PGLs may present at a younger age, often as multifocal tumors, with an increased risk of recurrence and a higher frequency of malignancy in those with SDHB mutations. SDH mutations induce angiogenesis and tumorogenesis through the inhibition of hypoxia-inducible factors (HIF)-propyl hyroxylase. A younger age at onset, malignancy, and a positive family history are clinical parameters of high specificity, but low sensitivity for diagnosis. Genetic analysis for mutations in SDH genes for the patient and family members, and surveillance for the affected patient and family members, are necessary where there are no clear clinical or family indicators for the syndrome. We present a case of a large abdominal malignant PGL in a 20-year-old pt. that went on without clinical detection for at least three years.
Conference: 7th Annual ENETS Conference (2010)
Category: Clinical
Presenting Author: Dr Mohammed Ahmed
#61 Multiple tumors in patients with pancreatic neuroendocrine tumours: morphological and immunohistochemical characteristics
Introduction: Pancreatic islet cell tumors occur in 80% of patients with MEN 1. Tumors are often multicentric. They often produce multiple peptides and biogenic amines.
Conference: 7th Annual ENETS Conference (2010)
Category: Basic
Presenting Author: Prof Larisa Gurevich
#103 From hormone dependent solid breast carcinoma to primary neuroendocrine carcinoma: a case report
Introduction: Primary neuroendocrine carcinoma of the breast is an extremely rare tumor with incidence of 0.27-0.5%.
Conference: 7th Annual ENETS Conference (2010)
Category: Clinical
Presenting Author: Dr Djuro P Macut
Authors: Macut D, Kecman G, Bogavac T, Popovic B, ...
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