Abstract library

23 results for "uncertain".
#324 Well-differentiated Pancreatic Neuroendocrine Tumor of Uncertain Behavior: A Case Report
Introduction: A small number of Pancreatic Endocrine Tumors (PET) are well-differentiated tumors(WDET) showing benign or uncertain behavior. Prognosis mainly depends on the presence/absence of liver/bone metastasis.
Conference: 8th Annual ENETS Conference (2011)
Category: Clinical
Presenting Author: Dr. Joana Couto
#1291 How Long Is the Piece of String? – How Patients Negotiate the Uncertainties of a NET Diagnosis
Introduction: NET Patient Interviews
Conference: 13th Annual ENETS conference (2016)
Category: ...none of the above
Presenting Author: Dr David Wyld
Authors: Wyld D, Plage S, Burge M, Broom A, ...
Keywords: Interviews
#50 Clinical-morphology correlation in diagnostics and evaluating surgery results of pancreatic insulinoma and nesidiobastosis
Introduction: Organic hyperinsulinism syndrome (OHS) is revealed in 85% cases of pancreas insulinoma. Nesidioblastosis (NB) induces OHS in 15% of the cases. Surgical cure provides all symptoms of insulinoma disappearing, while cytoreductive operation results in considerable improvement of life quality. There is no intraoperative opportunity to reveal insulinoma grade, even if an urgent biopsy is performed. Thus, it is essential to determine the cause of OHS and to apply the surgical cure method during the preoperational period, thereby improving the long-term prognosis.
Conference: 7th Annual ENETS Conference (2010)
Category: Basic
Presenting Author: Dr. Evelina Askenderova
#1722 New MEN-1 Gene Mutation Implicated in Familiar MEN-1 Syndrome Onset
Introduction: Multiple endocrine neoplasia type 1 (MEN1) is a rare genetic syndrome associated with an increased risk of developing parathyroid, pituitary and pancreatic neuroendocrine tumors. MEN1 has an autosomal dominant pattern of hereditability and it is usually related to mutations in menin coding gene
Conference: 14th Annual ENETS conference (2017)
Category: Clinical cases/reports
Presenting Author: MD Elisabetta Grego
#1920 Optimising Followup after Complete Surgical Resection of Gastrointestinal Neuroendocrine Tumours- A Delphi Process to Produce Expert Consensus in an Area Lacking Clinical Evidence
Introduction: Optimal follow-up for completely resected GI-NETS has not been well defined, with heterogeneity in awareness and application of existing guidelines.
Conference: 14th Annual ENETS conference (2017)
Category: ...none of the above
Presenting Author: Lesley Moody
Authors: Moody L, Segelov E, Chan D, Carsley S, ...
Keywords: RAM, NET
#18 Long-acting release octreotide induce complete response in type 1 gastric carcinoid tumors
Introduction: Gastric endocrine tumors (GET) are increasingly recognized due to expanding indications of upper gastrointestinal endoscopy. Often silent and benign, GET may also be aggressive when sporadic and may sometimes mimic the course of gastric adenocarcinoma. Current incidence of GETs is estimated at around 8% of digestive endocrine tumors. Yearly age-adjusted incidence is around 0.2 per population of 100,000. Gastric carcinoids (ECLomas) develop from gastric enterochromaffin-like cells (ECL cells) in response to chronically elevated gastrin. Type 1 tumors (ECLomas in the course of atrophic gastritis) may occur in conditions of achlorhydria secondary to auto-immune atrophic fundic gastritis. It occurs mostly in women and they are non-functioning tumors, typically found during upper GI endoscopy performed for dyspepsia. ECLomas present frequently as multiple polyps, usually < 1 cm in diameter in the gastric fundus. Type 1 tumors are almost exclusively benign lesions with little risk of deep invasion of the gastric parietal wall. The neoplastic ECL cells become progressively dedifferentiated with an increasing number of Ki-67 immunoreactive (IR) cell nuclei. In addition, there is a substantial decrease in argynophil and IR NE cells that can be visualized by conventional methods. ECLomas secondary to hypergastrinemia should be closely followed for signs of clinical and histopathological tumor progression. Such ECLomas deserve early, active, radical surgical treatment.
Traditionally, gastric carcinoid type 1 (GCA1s) are endoscopically or surgically removed, depending on the number, appearance and size of the tumors. Antrectomy, with surgical excision of the majority of the G cells, is thought to facilitate regression of these tumors by removing the source of excessive gastrin secretion; however, the long-term benefits of antrectomy still remain uncertain. Although proton pump inhibitors are effective in reducing hypergastrinemia-induced gastric acid hypersecretion in GCA2, they do not affect ECL-cell hyperplasia, and therefore their role in GCA1 is limited. Moreover, in selected cases, significant reduction of hypergastrinemia does not prevent development of ECL carcinoid, suggesting that, in addition to hypergastrinemia, other pathogenic or genetic factors may be involved. Treatment with somatostatin analogues (SSA) might impede ECL-cell hyperplasia by suppressing gastrin secretion and/or by a direct anti-proliferative effect on ECL cells. Treatment with SSAs in GCA1 leads to a substantial tumor load reduction, with a concomitant decrease of serum gastrin levels. Published data indicate an important anti-proliferative effect of SSA on ECL cells, providing clinical benefit and obviating, at least temporarily, the need for invasive therapies for GCA1. Morphometric studies demonstrated that, while antrectomy specifically decreased the volume of ECL cells versus the total volume of endocrine cells, octreotide reduces the overall endocrine cell volume. Although the number of treated patients is small, it has been suggested that SSA may exert important anti-proliferative effects either directly, by inhibiting ECL-cells proliferation, or indirectly through suppression of gastrin hypersecretion.
Conference: 7th Annual ENETS Conference (2010)
Category: Clinical
Presenting Author: MD Ricardo Caponero
#41 Immunohisochemical evaluation of EMT regulators, E- and N-cadherin in neuroendocrine Tumors of the Gastro-Entero-Pancreativ system
Introduction: Local tumor invasion represents the first step of the metastatic cascade of carcinomas, and requires changes in cell adhesion and migration properties of tumor cells. This biologic process is known as epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT). One key biochemical change associated with EMT is the loss of E-cadherin expression promoted by specific transcriptional repressors such as Snail, Slug, and Twist. Overexpression of EMT inducers increases other factors, such as FoxC2, although its role in EMT is poorly understood. Neuroendocrine tumors (NETs) of the gastroenteropancreatic (GEP) system, originated from the diffuse endocrine system, represent a heterogeneous group of tumors. Their prevalence has increased substantially over the past three decades, without substantial improvements in their clinical management, and their variable clinical course cannot be predicted by common clinicopathological parameters. Thus, new prognostic markers are urgently needed.
Conference: 7th Annual ENETS Conference (2010)
Category: Basic
Presenting Author: JOSE A. GALVÁN
#81 Gastroenteropancreatic neuroendocrine tumors (GEP-NETs): our experience in a multidisciplinary team in a university hospital
Introduction: Gastroenteropancreatic neuroendocrine tumors (GEP-NETs) have a low incidence and prevalence representing < 2% of all gastrointestinal tumors with a heterogeneous biological behavior and an often complex management.
Conference: 7th Annual ENETS Conference (2010)
Category: Clinical
Presenting Author: Dr Jose Manuel Cabezas-Agricola
#106 Gastroenteropancreatic neuroendocrine tumors: single institution clinicopathological study
Introduction: Neuroendocrine cells are widely distributed throughout the body, and neoplasms from these dispersed cells can arise at many sites. They are distinguished into two broad categories: 1) Tumors identified as small cell lung carcinomas with biology and natural history of a high-grade malignancy and characteristics of small cell undifferentiated or anaplastic appearance by light microscopy. The WHO categorizes these tumors as poorly-differentiated neuroendocrine carcinomas; 2) Well-defined neuroendocrine tumors (NETs) with variable, but most lyindolent biologic behavior and characteristic well-differentiated histologic features. The majority arise in the gastrointestinal tract and collectively they are referred as gastroenteropancreatic neuroendocrine tumors (GEP/NETs). They include carcinoid tumors, pancreatic islet cell tumors (gastrinoma, insulinoma, glucagonoma, VIPoma, somatostatinoma), paragangliomas, pheochromocytomas, and medullary thyroid carcinomas. The WHO classifies the GEP/NETs as well-differentiated NETs (carcinoid tumors) if they are noninvasive and have benign behavior or uncertain malignant potential. In contrast, GEP/NETs with characteristics of low-grade malignancy with invasion of the muscularis propria or beyond, or metastases, are characterized as well-differentiated neuroendocrine carcinomas (malignant carcinoids). Pancreatic islet cell tumors, whether functioning or not, are classified as well-differentiated NETs or well-differentiated neuroendocrine carcinomas, due to the (depending on) histologic characteristics. The WHO classification for gastroenteropancreatic NETs based on stage (ie size and presence of metastases) and grade (mitotic rate, perineural and lymphovascular invasion, Ki-67 proliferative index) categorizes them as well-differentiated NETs, e.g., carcinoid tumors, or as well-differentiated neuroendocrine carcinomas.
Conference: 7th Annual ENETS Conference (2010)
Category: Clinical
Presenting Author: Dr Michael M. Vaslamatzis
#126 Assessment of the proliferation marker Ki-67 by endoscopic ultrasound guided-Fine Needle Aspiration (EUS-FNA) in pancreatic endocrine tumors: A comparative analysis with histology of the surgical specimen
Introduction: Assessment of the proliferative index by Ki-67 immuno-labelling is an important prognostic parameter for the biologic behavior of digestive neuroendocrine tumors, usually established on the histological specimen obtained after surgery or macro-biopsy. However, small pancreatic endocrine tumors (PET) are more and more often recognized by CT/MRI and diagnosed by EUS. The value of Ki-67 labelling index (Ki-67-LI) on fine needle aspiration (FNA) is not well-established in this setting, although regularly assessed.
Conference: 7th Annual ENETS Conference (2010)
Category: Clinical
Presenting Author: Dr Ivan Borbath
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