The Application of Octreotide in a SINET Patient with Carcinoid Syndrome, Carcinoid Heart Disease and Carcinoid Crisis: A Case Report Abstract #1296

Introduction: In Chinese population, small intestinal neuroendocrine tumor (SINET) only accounts for 2.2% of gastroenteropancreatic NET, while carcinoid syndrome, carcinoid heart disease (CHD) and carcinoid crisis are rarer.
Aim(s): To report a case of SINET with carcinoid syndrome, CHD and carcinoid crisis happening sequentially and the usage of Octreotide in this patient.
Materials and methods: In August 2012 a 57-year-old male patient presented with diarrhea, flushing and weight loss due to SINET (G2, Stage IV). Octreotide LAR 30mg was applied every 4 weeks since August 2012.
Conference: 13th Annual ENETS conference 2016 (2016)
Category: Clinical cases/reports
Presenting Author: Luohai Chen

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