Early Evaluation of Sunitinib in Treatment of Advanced Gastroenteropancreatic Neuroendocrine Neoplasms (GEP-NENs) by CT Imaging: RECIST or Choi Criteria? Abstract #1334

Introduction: There is no study to assess RECIST and Choi criteria in evaluating response of advanced GEP-NENs treated with sunitinb.
Aim(s): To assess and compare Response Evaluation Criteria in Solid Tumors (RECIST) and Choi criteria in evaluating early response of advanced GEP-NENs treated with sunitinib.
Materials and methods: Eighteen patients with pathologically proven advanced GEP-NENs treated with sunitinib were enrolled in the study. Pre- and post-treatment enhanced CT scans were performed on all patients. Changes in target tumor size and density from pre-treatment to 1.4-3.0 months after treatment were measured and recorded for each patient. Tumor responses were identified by RECIST and Choi criteria. Time to tumor progression (TTP) for each patient was measured and compared between groups by Kaplan-Meier method.
Conference: 13th Annual ENETS conference 2016 (2016)
Category: Medical treatment - Targeted therapies
Presenting Author: Yanji Luo

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