Are all Metastatic Grade 3 WHO 2010 Neuroendocrine Carcinoma Poorly Differentiated? Abstract #507

Introduction: The WHO classification 2010 for neuroendocrine tumors (NET) defines poorly differentiated neuroendocrine carcinomas (NEC) as grade 3 (G3) according to mitoses> 20/10 HPF and/or Ki-67>20%.
Aim(s): To characterize G3 NET defined by a Ki-67>20% for their clinical, pathological characteristics, survival, response to cisplatinum therapy.
Materials and methods: Patients with non-small cell first line metastatic NET with Ki-67>20%, treated between 2000-2005. Parameters recorded: sex, age, primary, functional and genetic status, endocrine markers, differentiation, mitoses, necrosis, Indium-111-pentetreotide scintigraph (octreoscan) or PET FDG uptake, outcome, response to cisplatinum chemotherapy.
Conference: 9th Annual ENETS Conference (2012)
Category: Clinical
Presenting Author: Dr Fritz-Line Vélayoudom-Céphise

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