Clinicopathologic Characteristics of Chinese Patients with Gastroenteropancreatic Neuroendocrine Neoplasms: Results of a Nation-Wide Retrospective Epidemiology Study Abstract #2211

Introduction: he rare incidence of gastroenteropancreatic neuroendocrine neoplasms (GEP-NENs) has contributed to a paucity of large epidemiologic studies of patients with this condition, especially in China.
Aim(s): This study was conducted to summarize the clinicopathological characteristics of GEP-NENs in China.
Materials and methods: We collected patients’ data based on a hospital-based, nation-wide, and multi-center 10-year (2001-2010) retrospective study. All 2010 inpatient GEP-NEN cases including in this study were confirmed by pathology in the selected hospitals. GEP-NEN grading was carried out according to the WHO 2010 pathologic classification. The primary GEP-NEN sites were measured and the in the subgroups of cases, comparative analysis of different examination methods was carried out.
Conference: 15th Annual ENETS conference (2018)
Category: Epidemiology/Natural history/Prognosis- Registries, nationwide and regional surveys
Presenting Author: Pei Yu

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