CT Imaging Findings of Gastric Neuroendocrine Neoplasm According to 2010 WHO Classification Abstract #1079

Introduction: Gastric neuroendocrine neoplasm(G-NEN) is rarely detected at an early stage. Its prognosis varies based on grade and stage.
Aim(s): To describe CT findings of G-NEN according to 2010 WHO classification.
Materials and methods: 33 patients with histologically or pathologically documented G-NEN were included in this study.The lesions’number,location,shape,size,density,enhancement patterns and other changes on contrast-enhanced CT images were observed.Contrast-enhanced CT images of the tumors were reviewed between tumors different grading (NET,NEC).
Conference: 12th Annual ENETS Conference (2015)
Category: Imaging (radiology, nuclear medicine, endoscopy)
Presenting Author: ZH W Liang

To read results and conclusion, please login ...

Further abstracts you may be interested in

#37 Gastric GIST with synchronous neuroendocrine tumor of the pancreas, Case Report and Literature Review
Introduction: The Gastrointestinal Stromal Tumors (GIST) are the most common mesenchymal tumors of the gastrointestinal tract. These are rare tumors with an incidence of 15 new cases per million per year. They often occur in individuals over the age of 40 years, without gender predominance. The clinical behavior is variable and benign tumors are the most common. They can develop anywhere in the GI tract, but are more frequent in the stomach and small intestine. The primary treatment, when located, is the surgical resection, which can be complemented with the use of imatinib.
The occurrence of neuroendocrine tumors of the pancreas is rare, representing 1-5% of pancreatic cancers, and it is estimated that its incidence does not exceed 5 to one million. The tumors considered nonfunctioning (15-32% of pancreatic neuroendocrine tumors) are not associated with any syndrome, and are usually incidental. They have a slight predominance in males, and are more frequent in the 6th decade of life. Nonfunctioning tumors of islet cells are virtually all malignant tumors, and the treatment consists of surgical resection.
Conference: 7th Annual ENETS Conference (2010)
Category: Clinical
Presenting Author: Dra Amelia B Tavares
#106 Gastroenteropancreatic neuroendocrine tumors: single institution clinicopathological study
Introduction: Neuroendocrine cells are widely distributed throughout the body, and neoplasms from these dispersed cells can arise at many sites. They are distinguished into two broad categories: 1) Tumors identified as small cell lung carcinomas with biology and natural history of a high-grade malignancy and characteristics of small cell undifferentiated or anaplastic appearance by light microscopy. The WHO categorizes these tumors as poorly-differentiated neuroendocrine carcinomas; 2) Well-defined neuroendocrine tumors (NETs) with variable, but most lyindolent biologic behavior and characteristic well-differentiated histologic features. The majority arise in the gastrointestinal tract and collectively they are referred as gastroenteropancreatic neuroendocrine tumors (GEP/NETs). They include carcinoid tumors, pancreatic islet cell tumors (gastrinoma, insulinoma, glucagonoma, VIPoma, somatostatinoma), paragangliomas, pheochromocytomas, and medullary thyroid carcinomas. The WHO classifies the GEP/NETs as well-differentiated NETs (carcinoid tumors) if they are noninvasive and have benign behavior or uncertain malignant potential. In contrast, GEP/NETs with characteristics of low-grade malignancy with invasion of the muscularis propria or beyond, or metastases, are characterized as well-differentiated neuroendocrine carcinomas (malignant carcinoids). Pancreatic islet cell tumors, whether functioning or not, are classified as well-differentiated NETs or well-differentiated neuroendocrine carcinomas, due to the (depending on) histologic characteristics. The WHO classification for gastroenteropancreatic NETs based on stage (ie size and presence of metastases) and grade (mitotic rate, perineural and lymphovascular invasion, Ki-67 proliferative index) categorizes them as well-differentiated NETs, e.g., carcinoid tumors, or as well-differentiated neuroendocrine carcinomas.
Conference: 7th Annual ENETS Conference (2010)
Category: Clinical
Presenting Author: Dr Michael M. Vaslamatzis
#315 The Impact of 68Ga-DOTATOC PET/CT on the Multimodal Management of Patients with Neuroendocrine Tumors
Introduction: Accurate assessment of the primary tumor site and the extent of the metastatic burden are crucial and can be challenging, however, it is essential to the choice of optimal patient-tailored management.
Conference: 8th Annual ENETS Conference (2011)
Category: Clinical
Presenting Author: Prof. Andrea Frilling
#331 Four-years Follow-up in a Case of Gastric Neuroendocrine Carcinoma
Introduction: Poorly differentiated neuroendocrine carcinoma has a poor prognosis, regardless of the primary site.
Conference: 8th Annual ENETS Conference (2011)
Category: Clinical
Presenting Author: Catalina Poiana
#368 The Role of Image and Chromogranin A Level at Diagnosis: A Portuguese Review of 19 Patients
Introduction: Neuroendocrine tumors (NET) constitute a heterogeneous group of neoplasms. Biochemical neuroendocrine markers offer high sensitivity in establishing the diagnosis and, if correlated with image assessment, can provide important prognostic information.
Conference: 9th Annual ENETS Conference (2012)
Category: Clinical
Presenting Author: Dr. Pedro Barata