Diagnosis and Management of Insulinomas in a Tertiary Referral Center: A 10-Year Review Abstract #380

Introduction: Insulinomas are rare tumors. There are few reports of insulinoma from India. We present a retrospective analysis of patients with insulinoma evaluated at a tertiary referral center in South India.
Aim(s): To study the prevalence, clinical presentation, diagnostic techniques and surgical procedures employed in treating insulinomas.
Materials and methods: Medical records of patients with insulinomas seen in the period 2000-2010 were retrieved from the hospital’s medical records department and the records of the Departments of Gastro-intestinal Surgery, Radiology & Endocrinology. From these, data on clinical and diagnostic features, localization and surgical outcome were extracted. Pre-operative localization of tumor was attempted using a combination of radiological techniques, including trans-abdominal US, conventional contrast-enhanced CT scan, dual-phase CECT, magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), conventional pancreatic arteriography and selective pancreatic arteriography, namely, intra-arterial digital subtraction angiography with or without CECT.
Conference: 9th Annual ENETS Conference (2012)
Category: Clinical
Presenting Author: Dr Vijay Ramachandran

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