Effect of Dacarbazine Chemotherapy in Well-Differentiated Neuroendocrine Tumors Abstract #534

Introduction: Despite encouraging results of streptozocin combinations in patients with metastatic endocrine pancreatic tumors, this treatment modality consists of a five-day cycle and can cause renal insufficiency. Dacarbazine (DTIC) (650mg/m2 every four weeks) can easily be applied in an outpatient setting, but data on efficacy are limited.
Aim(s): Analysis of the efficacy of chemotherapy with DTIC in patients with histologically proven progressive metastasized neuroendocrine tumors (NET).
Materials and methods: Forty-four pts (24 males, 20 females) were enrolled in this open trial. Primary tumor localization was midgut in three, hindgut in one, bronchus in four, stomach in one, pancreas in 32 and unknown in three patients, respectively. The median age was 58 years (range 28-75). Seven courses of DTIC were administered in median (range 1-43).
Conference: 9th Annual ENETS Conference (2012)
Category: Clinical
Presenting Author: Dr. Daniela Müller

To read results and conclusion, please login ...

Further abstracts you may be interested in

#36 A monocentric analysis of patients with pulmonary neuroendocrine tumors over 15 years: long term survival and life quality dependent from histological subtypes and surgical management
Introduction: Pulmonary neuroendocrine tumors substantially differ from epithelial tumors in terms of tumor biology and prognosis. In specialized interdisciplinary centers, a broad therapeutical armentarium can be used to achieve optimal treatment.
Conference: 7th Annual ENETS Conference (2010)
Category: Clinical
Presenting Author: Prof. Johannes N Hoffmann
Authors: Zahn S, Hornung H, Schick K S, Winter H, ...
#90 The prognostic value of FDG-PET scan in neuroendocrine tumors: a retrospective analysis of 46 patients treated in one center
Introduction: Neuroendocrine tumors (NETs) are rare and generally indolent. For diagnostic purposes, the sensitivity of FDG-PET scan is known to be low in this setting, though when positive, its prognostic value is not well-defined in NET.
Conference: 7th Annual ENETS Conference (2010)
Category: Clinical
Presenting Author: Dr Ivan Borbath
#106 Gastroenteropancreatic neuroendocrine tumors: single institution clinicopathological study
Introduction: Neuroendocrine cells are widely distributed throughout the body, and neoplasms from these dispersed cells can arise at many sites. They are distinguished into two broad categories: 1) Tumors identified as small cell lung carcinomas with biology and natural history of a high-grade malignancy and characteristics of small cell undifferentiated or anaplastic appearance by light microscopy. The WHO categorizes these tumors as poorly-differentiated neuroendocrine carcinomas; 2) Well-defined neuroendocrine tumors (NETs) with variable, but most lyindolent biologic behavior and characteristic well-differentiated histologic features. The majority arise in the gastrointestinal tract and collectively they are referred as gastroenteropancreatic neuroendocrine tumors (GEP/NETs). They include carcinoid tumors, pancreatic islet cell tumors (gastrinoma, insulinoma, glucagonoma, VIPoma, somatostatinoma), paragangliomas, pheochromocytomas, and medullary thyroid carcinomas. The WHO classifies the GEP/NETs as well-differentiated NETs (carcinoid tumors) if they are noninvasive and have benign behavior or uncertain malignant potential. In contrast, GEP/NETs with characteristics of low-grade malignancy with invasion of the muscularis propria or beyond, or metastases, are characterized as well-differentiated neuroendocrine carcinomas (malignant carcinoids). Pancreatic islet cell tumors, whether functioning or not, are classified as well-differentiated NETs or well-differentiated neuroendocrine carcinomas, due to the (depending on) histologic characteristics. The WHO classification for gastroenteropancreatic NETs based on stage (ie size and presence of metastases) and grade (mitotic rate, perineural and lymphovascular invasion, Ki-67 proliferative index) categorizes them as well-differentiated NETs, e.g., carcinoid tumors, or as well-differentiated neuroendocrine carcinomas.
Conference: 7th Annual ENETS Conference (2010)
Category: Clinical
Presenting Author: Dr Michael M. Vaslamatzis
#109 Transarterial chemoebolization (TACE) of liver metastases derived from neuroendocrine tumors is an effective treatment only in patients with low or mediate hepatic tumor burden
Introduction: The onset of metastases in patients with neuroendocrine tumors of the gastrointestinal tract (GEP-NET) represents a negative predictor of survival and tumor-associated complications. Thereby, most of these patients develop liver metastases during their disease. Transarterial chemoembolization (TACE) has been shown before to be an effective and safe treatment of liver metastases. However, the optimal time point in treatment of liver metastases has not yet been determined, especially in patients with non-functional GEP-NET.
Conference: 7th Annual ENETS Conference (2010)
Category: Clinical
Presenting Author: Dr Anja Rinke
Authors: Rinke A, König A, Müller D, König U, ...
#110 Slug represents an important regulator of E-cadherin expression in neuroendocrine tumor cells of the pancreas
Introduction: Neuroendocrine tumors of the pancreas form an inhomogenous group of epithelial neoplasms. They differ from other types of pancreatic cancers by showing an extended survival of patients, which is due to a mostly slow proliferation rate of the tumor. However, some of these neuroendocrine tumors are characterized by an early onset of metastases, which cannot be predicted by any available method. The epithelial to mesenchymal transition (EMT) represents a central part of cell migration and metastasis. During EMT, cells loosen their cellular contacts, leave the tissue, and become migrating single cells. One of the integral compounds of cell adhesion represents the E-cadherin adhesion module, which contains mostly E-cadherin and several catenins. A loss of this adhesion module is associated with tumor progression, migration and metastasis in many types of cancer.
Conference: 7th Annual ENETS Conference (2010)
Category: Basic
Presenting Author: Dr Alexander König
Close
Notice

Dear conference participant,

Thank you for participating in the ENETS Virtual Conference 2020!

You now have the opportunity to view the webcasts, abstracts and e-posters via My ENETS. Don't miss out any of the exciting talks and take your time to view the clinical and basic science abstract sessions.

If you require a certificate of attendance, please log into My ENETS and select “Annual Conferences” from the side menu, then click on “My registrations” and select your registration for 2020. Please choose "Certificate o.A." to receive your certificate of attendance.

A note on CME accreditation:

ENETS has been liaising with UEMS regarding CME accreditation for the virtual conference. At present, we do not have a definitive answer. We will keep you updated.

 

Wishing you all the best,

The entire ENETS team