Evaluation of Nurse Preferences between the Lanreotide Autogel New Syringe and Octreotide Long-Acting Release Syringe: An International Simulated Use Study (PRESTO) Abstract #2932

Introduction: A new lanreotide autogel/depot (LAN) syringe was developed based on feedback from a human factors study to improve user experience.
Aim(s): To assess injector preference between the LAN new syringe and octreotide long-acting release (OCT LAR) syringe.
Materials and methods: PRESTO was a multinational, simulated-use study in nurses with ≥2 years’ experience injecting LAN or octreotide LAR in acromegaly and/or neuroendocrine tumours. Nurses were given materials to administer injections of LAN new syringe (120 mg) and OCT LAR syringe (20 or 30 mg) into injection pads. The sponsor was not involved in these sessions. In an anonymous web-based questionnaire, nurses reported overall preference (‘strong’ or ‘slight’; primary endpoint), and rated and ranked the importance of 9 attributes for each syringe (1 [not at all] to 5 [very much]).
Conference: 17th Annual ENETS Conference 2020 (2020)
Category: Medical treatment - Chemotherapy Somatostatin analogues, Interferon
Presenting Author: Xuan Mai Truong Thanh

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