Interest of combined chromogranin A and pancreatic polypeptide for diagnosis and follow-up of gastroenteropancreatic endocrine carcinoma Abstract #67

Introduction: Assessment of tumor burden changes is essential for the management of well-differentiated gastroenteropancreatic neuroendocrine carcinoma (GEPNET). Chromogranin A (CgA) is the principal tumor marker for such tumors; however, its use to evaluate morphological tumor progression is not validated. Combined CgA and pancreatic polypeptide (PP) may increase sensitivity in the diagnosis of GEP-NET.
Aim(s): 1) To evaluate the sensitivity of PP and CgA in the presence of GEPNET and 2) to compare changes in serum CgA and PP levels with RECIST morphological alteration.
Materials and methods: Firstly, in a retrospective study including all patients with GEPNET seen between June 2004 to March 2008, and who had at least one blood sample, the dosage of CgA (CgA-RIACT kit, CisBio International, normal < 100 ng/ml) and PP (EURIA-PP, Eurodiagnostica, normal <100.pmol/L) were compared with clinical and morphological data. Secondly, a variation in CgA or PP (defined as change [plus 50%] or not) was compared to RECIST criteria in 57 patients with elevated CgA and/or PP levels (112 periods with median delay between two dosages of 6 [3-12] months).
Conference: 7th Annual ENETS Conference (2010)
Category: Basic
Presenting Author: Dr Thomas WALTER

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