Metachronous Pancreatic Neuroendocrine Tumors. An Unusual Interesting Case Report Abstract #1846

Introduction: Literature surveillance state that in multiple endocrine neoplasia (MEN) disease, frequently occur, synchronous or metachronous neuroendocrine tumors (NETs) but in non-MEN patients are extremely rare.
Aim(s): The main objective is to present an interesting unique case
Materials and methods: A male 70-years-old presented with pancreatic mass and liver lesions.
Conference: 14th Annual ENETS conference 2017 (2017)
Category: Medical treatment - Others
Presenting Author: DR Nektarios Alevizopoulos
Keywords: pancreatic

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