Occurrence of Type 1 Gastric Carcinoid In Patients with Autoimmune Chronic Atrophic Gastritis Abstract #621

Introduction: The actual incidence of type1 gastric carcinoids (GC1) as a long-term complication of chronic autoimmune atrophic gastritis (CAAG) remains to be clarified as studies are few.
Aim(s): To evaluate GC1 prevalence and incidence in CAAG.
Materials and methods: From 2000 to 2012,107 patients were diagnosed as having CAAG based on gastric histology, presence of parietal cell antibodies, pH gastric levels. Active H.pylori infection was excluded. They underwent clinical and endoscopic follow-up (median follow-up 36 months). ECL cells status was classified in: no hyperplasia, simple, linear, micronodular hyperplasia, and GC1. Plasma chromogranin A (CgA) and gastrin were also measured. During follow-up, the risk of developing GC1 was evaluated and expressed as person-time incidence rate.
Conference: 10th Annual ENETS Conference (2013)
Category: Non digestive NETs (bronchial, MTC, pheochromocytoma)
Presenting Author: Dr Roberta E Rossi

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