Patients Treated for Well-Differentiated Neuroendocrine Tumors: A Study to Evaluate the Ratio of Patients Lost to Follow-up Abstract #216

Introduction: Well-differentiated neuroendocrine tumors (wdNET) are considered more indolent than other epithelial malignancies. Median survival for patients with G1/G2 NET can range from 33 to 223 months.
Aim(s): In this observational, retrospective study we tried to assess the ratio of patients followed by a NET specialist that were lost within five years.
Materials and methods: All the reports for patients diagnosed with wdNET and discussed in our NET monthly multidisciplinary meetings (MDM) from March 2004 to October 2009 were included. Patients were classified into two groups: “followed” when we found a consultation report with a NET specialist less than two years ago and “Lost to follow up” when the visit was older.
Conference: 8th Annual ENETS Conference (2011)
Category: Clinical
Presenting Author: Pr Rosine Guimbaud

To read results and conclusion, please login ...

Further abstracts you may be interested in

#54 The clinical challenge of patients with a thoracic or neck neuroendocrine tumor: a retrospective analysis from a single Irish institution
Introduction: Thoracic and neck neuroendocrine tumors (T-N-NETs) represent a rare and intriguing condition and the management of patients with a NET localized at the thorax or neck can be extremely problematic. An expert and multidisciplinary approach is generally required for the optimal management of NET patients. A systematic multidisciplinary approach to NET patients has been recently established at our institution.
Conference: 7th Annual ENETS Conference (2010)
Category: Clinical
Presenting Author: Gianluca Tamagno
#57 Clinical and demographic characteristics in patients newly diagnosed with neuroendocrine tumors (NET)
Introduction: Neuroendocrine tumors (NETs) are tumors that form from cells that release hormones in response to a signal from the nervous system. These tumors may secrete higher-than-normal amounts of hormones, which can cause many different symptoms.
Conference: 7th Annual ENETS Conference (2010)
Category: Clinical
Presenting Author: Chi-Chang Chen
#59 Incidence and clinical significance of adrenal masses in patients with gastrenteropancreatic neuroendocrine tumors
Introduction: The widespread application of modern imaging modalities, mainly computerized tomography (CT) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), has revealed a 2-3% incidence of inadvertently discovered adrenal masses, the majority of which are non-functioning benign adrenal adenomas. In the presence of a known malignancy, such lesions have a more than 30% incidence of being metastases. As patients with gastrenteropancreatic neuroendocrine tumors (GEP-NETS) have mainly well-differentiated and slow-growing tumors and are subject to routine abdominal imaging for disease staging or during follow-up, it is important to study the incidence and significance of such lesions based on the recently introduced TNM classification system.
Conference: 7th Annual ENETS Conference (2010)
Category: Clinical
Presenting Author: Dr Georgios Kanakis
#81 Gastroenteropancreatic neuroendocrine tumors (GEP-NETs): our experience in a multidisciplinary team in a university hospital
Introduction: Gastroenteropancreatic neuroendocrine tumors (GEP-NETs) have a low incidence and prevalence representing < 2% of all gastrointestinal tumors with a heterogeneous biological behavior and an often complex management.
Conference: 7th Annual ENETS Conference (2010)
Category: Clinical
Presenting Author: Dr Jose Manuel Cabezas-Agricola
#106 Gastroenteropancreatic neuroendocrine tumors: single institution clinicopathological study
Introduction: Neuroendocrine cells are widely distributed throughout the body, and neoplasms from these dispersed cells can arise at many sites. They are distinguished into two broad categories: 1) Tumors identified as small cell lung carcinomas with biology and natural history of a high-grade malignancy and characteristics of small cell undifferentiated or anaplastic appearance by light microscopy. The WHO categorizes these tumors as poorly-differentiated neuroendocrine carcinomas; 2) Well-defined neuroendocrine tumors (NETs) with variable, but most lyindolent biologic behavior and characteristic well-differentiated histologic features. The majority arise in the gastrointestinal tract and collectively they are referred as gastroenteropancreatic neuroendocrine tumors (GEP/NETs). They include carcinoid tumors, pancreatic islet cell tumors (gastrinoma, insulinoma, glucagonoma, VIPoma, somatostatinoma), paragangliomas, pheochromocytomas, and medullary thyroid carcinomas. The WHO classifies the GEP/NETs as well-differentiated NETs (carcinoid tumors) if they are noninvasive and have benign behavior or uncertain malignant potential. In contrast, GEP/NETs with characteristics of low-grade malignancy with invasion of the muscularis propria or beyond, or metastases, are characterized as well-differentiated neuroendocrine carcinomas (malignant carcinoids). Pancreatic islet cell tumors, whether functioning or not, are classified as well-differentiated NETs or well-differentiated neuroendocrine carcinomas, due to the (depending on) histologic characteristics. The WHO classification for gastroenteropancreatic NETs based on stage (ie size and presence of metastases) and grade (mitotic rate, perineural and lymphovascular invasion, Ki-67 proliferative index) categorizes them as well-differentiated NETs, e.g., carcinoid tumors, or as well-differentiated neuroendocrine carcinomas.
Conference: 7th Annual ENETS Conference (2010)
Category: Clinical
Presenting Author: Dr Michael M. Vaslamatzis