Peptide Receptor Radionuclide Therapy (PRRT) in Gastroenteropancreatic Grade 3 Neuroendocrine Neoplasms: A Retrospective International Multicenter Study Abstract #2072

Introduction: Gastroenteropancreatic (GEP) grade 3 neuroendocrine neoplasms (NEN G3) are rare, highly malignant neoplasms with poor prognosis and limited therapeutic options. Median survival following chemotherapy is only 10-12 months.
Aim(s): Our aim was to assess the outcome after peptide receptor radionuclide therapy (PRRT) in patients with GEP NEN G3.
Materials and methods: In a retrospective international multicenter study we analyzed the outcome of PRRT in patients with GEP NEN G3, defined as Ki67>20%. Using Kaplan-Meier estimation, Progression Free Survival (PFS) and overall survival (OS) were calculated.
Conference: 15th Annual ENETS conference (2018)
Category: Nuclear Medicine - Imaging and Therapy (PRRT)
Presenting Author: MD, PhD Dorthe Skovgaard

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