Primary Lymph Node Gastrinoma: A Genuine Entity? Two Case Reports and a Review of the Literature Abstract #283

Introduction: The existence of primary lymph node gastrinoma has been proposed but is controversial. We report two cases (Case A - 37-year-old male, Case B - 43-year-old male) of apparent primary lymph node gastrinoma.
Aim(s): We report two cases (Case A - 37-year-old male, Case B - 43-year-old male) of apparent primary lymph node gastrinoma.
Materials and methods: Case A had diarrhoea and abdominal pain. Localizing studies disclosed a solitary peripancreatic tumor. Case B presented with multiple duodenal ulcers. Biochemical confirmation of gastrinoma in both cases. Localizing studies indicated a solitary peripancreatic lesion. Proceeded to meticulous abdominal exploration including duodenal wall.
Conference: 8th Annual ENETS Conference (2011)
Category: Clinical
Presenting Author: Dr Richard W Carroll

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