Progression of Mesenteric Metastasis in Small Intestinal Neuroendocrine Tumors Abstract #2095

Introduction: A metastatic mesenteric mass is a hallmark of small intestinal neuroendocrine tumours (SI-NETs). However, little is known about the development of a SI-NET associated mesenteric mass over time.
Aim(s): The objective of this study was to gain insight in the evolution of mesenteric metastasis and find predictors for progression of mesenteric disease.
Materials and methods: Retrospectively, 530 patients with proven SI-NET and ≥2 available CT-scans were assessed for clinical characteristics at diagnosis and presence and growth of mesenteric mass on every consecutive CT-scan.
Conference: 15th Annual ENETS conference (2018)
Category: Imaging and Interventions (radiology, endoscopy)
Presenting Author: Drs. Anela Blazevic

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