Survival of Neuroendocrine Tumour Patients in Newcastle NHS Foundation Trust Abstract #33

Introduction: Neuroendocrine tumors (NETs) are rare neoplasms, with an incidence of 2-2.4 per 100,000, which derive from the neurones and epithelial cells of the diffuse neuroendocrine system. Neuropeptide-secreting NETs may present with overt clinical symptoms including abdominal pain, flushing and diarrhoea, whereas non-functioning NETs may be asymptomatic or present with obstructive symptoms. In Newcastle NHS Foundation Trust, NET patients are managed with a multi-disciplinary approach, according to UK and European NET guidelines.
Aim(s): What is the 5-year survival rate in Newcastle NHS Foundation Trust NET patients? How does this compare with guideline 5-year survival rates? How do age at diagnosis, primary tumor site and stage and grade of tumor influence 5-year survival?
Materials and methods: Records of 101 patients attending Newcastle NET clinic in Autumn 2005 were retrospectively analysed; inclusion criteria were diagnosis and histopathological classification of NET. Sixteen patients were excluded from the study due to being lost to follow-up or having non-NET diagnosis. Five-year survival rates were determined for the cohort and compared with those published in current UK and European NET management guidelines. The influence of age at diagnosis, site of primary tumor and histopathological stage and grade of tumor at diagnosis on 5-year survival was analysed. Statistical analysis was performed with Kaplan-Meier survival curves and the log-rank test.
Conference: 7th Annual ENETS Conference (2010)
Category: Clinical
Presenting Author: Dr Andy James

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