Towards Personalizing PRRT with [177Lu]-Dotatate to Minimise Renal Toxicity in Neuroendocrine Tumour Patients Abstract #1787

Introduction: The kidney is a dose-limiting organ in [177Lu]-Dotatate PRRT (Lutate) and thus renal function is an important prescribing consideration for NET patients. The effect of baseline renal function on kidney absorbed dose is unclear.
Aim(s): To investigate the relationship between glomerular filtration rate (GFR) with the fast component of radiopharmaceutical whole body clearance and kidney absorbed dose.
Materials and methods: A retrospective study of 19 metastatic NET patients who received 4 cycles of Lutate at our institution. GFR was obtained at baseline (n=19) and post cycle 2 (n=8). Whole body retention of Lutate was measured with the gamma camera at each cycle and radiation absorbed dose to the kidneys was evaluated from quantitative SPECT images. Whole body clearance was obtained from bi-exponential fit to planar whole body images of retained Lutate.
Conference: 14th Annual ENETS conference (2017)
Category: Medical treatment - Targeted therapies
Presenting Author: Dr Enid Eslick

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