Treatment of Malignant Neuroendocrine Tumors of the Hepatopancreatododenal Region Abstract #546

Introduction: The incidence of malignant NETs of the hepatopancreatoduodenal region is currently set at 10-15 cases per 100,000 people. Patient treatment and prognosis differ from those with adenocarcinoma.
Aim(s): To improve the management of malignant NETs.
Materials and methods: From 1982 to 2010, 72 patients with malignant NETs of the hepatopancreatododenal region underwent treatment in our clinic, and 31 of them had metastases. There were 40 insulinomas, 13 gastrinomas, eight nonfunctioning NETs, six ViIPomas and glucagonomas and eight cases of liver metastases without primary tumor localizations. The malignant nature of NETs was established only in 40% of the patients before surgery. We performed 61 operations on 57 patients: distal pancreatic resections (35), enucleation of the tumors (11), Whipple's procedure (5), liver resections (6), gastrectomies (3), diagnostic laparotomies (3). Chemoembolization was used in 10 cases and in three cases – alcohol sclerotherapy. SAS were administered to 12 patients who were not operated on and three patients were on symptomatic treatment.
Conference: 9th Annual ENETS Conference (2012)
Category: Clinical
Presenting Author: Ivan Vasiliev

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