Treatment Practices in European Centers with Interest in Neuroendocrine Carcinomas and High Grade (G3) Neuroendocrine Tumors Abstract #956

Introduction: Aggressive neuroendocrine neoplasms (NEN) encompass both poorly differentiated carcinomas (NEC) and high grade neuroendocrine tumors (G3-NET) with a Ki-67 index >20%; WHO 2010.
Aim(s): We wished to examine as to whether NEC and G3-NET are considered differently.
Materials and methods: An electronic survey of 39 questions on NEC and G3-NET was constructed on physician practices about characteristics, diagnosis and therapy. Sent to KN members from 23 centres with an interest in NEN (20 centers responded).
Conference: 11th Annual ENETS Conference (2014)
Category: Epidemiology/Natural history/Prognosis - Registries, nationwide and regional surveys
Presenting Author: MD Ingrid Holst Olsen

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