Upfront Surgery in Patients with High-Grade GEP NEN and MINEN: A Nordic Multicenter Study of 201 Patients Abstract #2725

Introduction: Surgery is the principal treatment for loco-regional gastroenteropancreatic (GEP) neuroendocrine tumors (NET). However, whether surgery is beneficial in high-grade neuroendocrine neoplasms (NEN) and mixed neuroendocrine-non neuroendocrine neoplasms (MiNEN) is not known.
Aim(s): To investigate if surgery is beneficial in patients with high-grade (Ki-67>20%) GEP NEN and GEP MiNEN stage I-III or stage IV.
Materials and methods: Retrospective study from 8 Scandinavian centers. Overall survival (OS) and progression free survival (PFS)/disease free survival (DFS) were analyzed by Kaplan-Meier estimate. Prognostic factors were evaluated using COX regression.
Conference: 17th Annual ENETS Conference 2020 (2020)
Category: Surgical treatment and Ablative Therapies
Presenting Author: MD, PhD Hans-Christian Pommergaard

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