Chilean Neuroendocrine Tumours Hospital Registry: Initial Data of a Latin-America Perspective. Abstract #1450

Introduction: Neuroendocrine tumours (NET) have increasing area of clinical and scientific research. The NET registry of the Pontificia Universidad Católica de Chile (PUC) is the first chilean database which systematically collects data on patients with neuroendocrine tumours.
Aim(s): Monitoring the overall number of patients with TNE who have been treated, with assessment of safety and effectiveness of treatment.
Materials and methods: Non-interventional, retrospective and prospective observational study (between January 1995 to October 2015) of demographic data, clinical features and survival rate of patient with diagnosis of NET at the PUC. Data are collected as anonymous records with encrypted personal data of patients.
Conference: 13th Annual ENETS conference (2016)
Category: Epidemiology/Natural history/Prognosis - Registries, nationwide and regional surveys
Presenting Author: MD Marcelo Garrido

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