Clinical Efficacy of Peptide Receptor Radionuclide Therapy in Patients with Neuroendocrine Neoplasm Abstract #2782

Introduction: Peptide receptor radionuclide therapy (PRRT) is an established treatment of metastatic neuroendocrine neoplasms (NEN) with positive effects on both progression free survival (PFS) and overall survival (OS). Only a few previous studies have investigated the effect of a second series and hence a retreatment with PRRT.
Aim(s): To investigate the PFS and OS in patients with NEN treated with multiple series of PRRT at the ENETS center of excellence at Aarhus University Hospital.
Materials and methods: Data from 150 patients with NEN in the gastrointestinal (GI) and bronchopulmonary (BP) system, were retrospectively reviewed. Kaplan-Meier estimation was used to determine progression-free survival (PFS) and overall survival (OS) with subgroup analysis by primary tumor, Ki67-index, type of radioisotope and number of PRRT series.
Conference: 17th Annual ENETS Conference 2020 (2020)
Category: Nuclear Medicine - Imaging and Therapy (PRRT)
Presenting Author: Medical Student Michala Danielle Zacho

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