Dissociation Between Iodine-131 meta-iodobenzylguanidine (MIBG) Scintigraphy and Radiolabeled Octreotide in the Localization and Management of Sporadic Malignant Pheochromocytoma: An Impact on Management Abstract #177

Introduction: The Rx of malignant pheochromocytomas w/negative MIBG scan remains a challanging problem. Octreoscan is helpful in localization and Rx planning in such cases. Rx using SST analog & PRRT is a desirable goal.
Aim(s): To report a case of recurrent malignant pheochromocytoma with liver, skeletal, pulmonary metastases and negative MIBG. Refinements in Rx are needed.
Materials and methods: A 41-year-old female had resection of sporadic multiple left adrenal pheochromocytoma, the largest 5x4 cm with capsular invasion eight years ago, followed by resection of local recurrence and liver mets five years later, was referred to us. We did serum Ca++, calcitonin, 24h urine meta/normetanephrines, MIBG, CT chest/abdomen, PET-CT, Octreoscan, CGA & genetic studies.
Conference: 8th Annual ENETS Conference (2011)
Category: Clinical
Presenting Author: Dr. Mohammed NMI Ahmed
Authors: Ahmed M

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