Positron Emission Tomography (PET) Predictors of Tumor Response to Peptide Receptor Radionuclide Therapy (PRRT) in Metastatic Neuroendocrine Tumors (NET) Abstract #2119

Introduction: Pretherapeutic 68Gallium-DOTA-(0-Tyr3)-octreotate (68Ga-DOTATATE) PET standardised uptake value (SUV) has shown conflicting results in the prediction of tumour response to radionuclide therapy.
Aim(s): We aimed to assess pretherapeutic SUV parameters with tumour lesion response in patients with metastatic NET.
Materials and methods: Pre and post PRRT 68Ga-DOTATATE PET-CT were retrospectively analysed in patients who were treated with four cycles of 7.45GBq Lutetium octreotate PRRT. Pretreatment SUV parameters were correlated with response assessment at 6 months including change in lesion diameter (LD), morphologic tumour volume (ATV) and somatostatin receptor tumour volume (STV).
Conference: 15th Annual ENETS conference (2018)
Category: Nuclear Medicine - Imaging and Therapy (PRRT)
Presenting Author: Dr Rahul Ladwa

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Authors: Szalus N, Pawlak D, Dziuk M, Koza M, ...
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