Comparison of Radiological and Histological Tumor Size in Pancreatic Neuroendocrine Neoplasm Abstract #1479

Introduction: Radiological tumor size of pancreatic neuroendocrine neoplasms (PNEN) is crucial for management especially for asymptomatic, small lesions.
Aim(s): Aim of this study was to compare radiological tumor size (RTS) and pathological tumor size (PTS) in patients with PNEN.
Materials and methods: 231 patients with sporadic PNEN who underwent pancreatic resection between 2000 and 2014 were included. RTS was defined as the largest tumor diameter at Ultra-Sound (US), Endoscopic Ultrasound (EUS), Computed Tomography (CT) or Magnetic Resonance (MR). PTS was defined as the largest tumor diameter at final pathological analysis.
Conference: 13th Annual ENETS conference (2016)
Category: Surgical treatment
Presenting Author: Stefano Partelli

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