International Survey of Clinical Practice Exploring Use of Platinum-Etoposide Chemotherapy for Extra-Pulmonary High Grade Neuroendocrine Carcinoma (EP-G3-NEC) Abstract #2034

Introduction: Platinum-etoposide (PE) chemotherapy (CH) is a globally established combination for EP-G3-NEC; the optimal schedule has not been established.
Aim(s): The aim was to explore which PE CH schedules are in use across centres, to assess consistency in clinical practice.
Materials and methods: An international survey was designed, and completed by clinicians with an expertise in the field.
Conference: 15th Annual ENETS conference (2018)
Category: Medical treatment - Chemotherapy Somatostatin analogues, Interferon
Presenting Author: Dr Angela Lamarca

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