Primary Renal Somatostatinoma with Hepatic Metastases Abstract #224

Introduction: Somatostatinomas are rare gastroenteropancreatic neuroendocrine tumors (GEP-NET) with a primary lesion that is invariably localized to the pancreas (40%) or duodenum or jejunum (50%).
Aim(s): We present a case of metastatic somatostatinoma with a likely renal primary and a ‘somatostatin’ syndrome.
Materials and methods: A 49-year-old female referred with metastatic neuroendocrine tumor. 15-20 year history of right-sided lower chest and upper abdomen pain which had worsened in the preceding months, and had recently developed flushing, indigestion, and increased defecation. US revealed liver and renal masses.
Conference: 8th Annual ENETS Conference (2011)
Category: Clinical
Presenting Author: Dr Richard W Carroll

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