Somatostatin Analogs for Pancreatic Neuroendocrine Tumors: Is There Any Benefit When Ki-67 Is ≥ 10%? Abstract #3034

Introduction: The antiproliferative effect of first-line long acting somatostatin analogs (SSA) in advanced gastro-entero-pancreatic neuroendocrine tumors (GEP-NETs) was shown in the PROMID and the CLARINET trials. Efficacy data in pancreatic NETs (PanNETs) with Ki-67 ≥ 10% are limited.
Aim(s): To describe the efficacy and toxicity of first-line SSAs in a series of advanced, well-differentiated PanNETs with Ki-67 ≥ 10%.
Materials and methods: Retrospective, multicentre analysis including patients treated between 2014-2018 across 9 centers of the NET CONNECT Network. The primary aim was progression-free survival (PFS); toxicity and overall survival (OS) were secondary aims.
Conference: 17th Annual ENETS Conference 2020 (2020)
Category: Medical treatment - Chemotherapy Somatostatin analogues, Interferon
Presenting Author: MD Teresa Alonso Gordoa

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