Reassessment of Risk Factors Associated with Locoregional Lymph Nodal Metastases in Well-Differentiated Appendiceal Neuroendocrine Neoplasms Abstract #2118

Introduction: To prevent loco-regional recurrence and subsequent development of distant metastases in Appendiceal Neuro-Endocrine Neoplasms (ANEN), the existing Guidelines have identified risk factors which would indicate a prophylactic right hemicolectomy(RHC).
Aim(s): To assess the importance of those factors and their association with regional lymph nodal invasion(LNI) at RHC.
Materials and methods: Over a 10-year period, 263 patients with ANEN were identified. Patients who underwent RHC were categorized into Group A(GA): those with LNI at RHC and Group B(GB): those without LNI. The original tumour size, location, margin invasion, grade, meso-appendiceal invasion (MAI), angioinvasion, lymph vessels and perineural invasion were assessed.
Conference: 15th Annual ENETS conference (2018)
Category: Epidemiology/Natural history/Prognosis- Registries, nationwide and regional surveys
Presenting Author: Dr. Michail Galanopoulos

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