The Association between Gastrin and Glucose Serum Concentration in Hypergastrinemic Patients with Gastric Neuroendocrine Tumors Type 1 and ECL-Cells Hyperplasia Abstract #2284

Introduction: There is previous data demonstrating that elevated gastrin levels could exert some effect potentiating the glucose-induced insulin secretion.
Aim(s): To evaluate whether there is a relation between fasting serum glucose and/or HbA1c and serum gastrin concentrations in patients with ECL-cells hyperplasia (ECH) and gastric neuroendocrine tumors type 1 (G1NETs).
Materials and methods: Gastrin (normal range: <110pg/ml), fasting glucose levels (normal range: 70 to 100mg/dl) and HbA1c (%) were measured in 112 patients with either ECH (n=38) or G1NETs. (n=74). Impaired Fasting Glucose (IFG) was defined as fasting glucose level ≥ 100mg/dl. None of the patients was on medication known to affect gastrin levels.
Conference: 15th Annual ENETS conference (2018)
Category: Biomarkers
Presenting Author: MD Krystallenia Alexandraki

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